Shops & Business

A 2,200-square-foot store tucked into a St. Louis Park retail strip might not seem like an obvious location for a mind-boggling shopping experience. It isn’t the Mall of America, but entering the only beer-specific store in Minnesota will make you stop short.

The Johnson's Family Garden circa 1930.

From 1926 to 1939, Johnson’s Family Garden was located on the southeast corner of Excelsior Boulevard and Natchez Avenue.  The brainchild of Robert Johnson, it was a family fun spot and featured a rock garden and canaries.

This little artist works diligently on her art project at I Heart Kids' Art.

As the mother of two young kids, ages 5½ and 1, St. Louis Park resident Robyn Cruey knows the importance of early childhood development.

The St. Louis Park Community Foundation (SLPCF) believes in making a difference in the lives of local residents.

There’s no mistaking what this is, even before those arches became golden. Our first McDonald’s was the state’s second (the first was in Roseville), and the world's 93rd. But construction of the St. Louis Park McDonald’s at 6320 Lake St.

As longtime St. Louis Park residents, Ed Volker of House of Note and his daughter Beth Hallfin of House of Sport, take great pride in being local.

This comical photo actually tells a couple of different stories. From left to right are T.B. Walker’s Methodist Church, “Papa’s Dogs” (as labeled in the original photo), Billy Otts, and two hotels, both complete with saloons.

Daily water exercise in the pool, nightly card games (plus bingo on Saturdays) and twice-weekly hosting sessions in the dining room keep Fran Benson, 90, very busy at Parkshore Senior Community in St.

Max’s in St Louis Park is serious about its high-quality, uniquely designed jewelry. Owner Ellen Hertz is equally proud of the casual and inviting atmosphere.

 1). Which of these famous people did not hail from St. Louis Park?a.                 Ethan Coen b.                Al Franken c.                 Al Gore d.                Harry Reasoner   2). Circle the names of the four historic railroad lines that came through St.

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